the Spring Equinox Assemblage

In All, Assemblages by Mark Evans

The Spring Equinox assemblage is a fanciful depiction of an equal split between light and dark that happens to the earth between spring and summer. Made from a split toy ostrich( gold and silver), cast resin jewels and two hunks of resin crystals colored cognac and clear, this mixed media object is a metaphor for one of the earth’s timeless cycles.
A spring equinox is the moment in time and space when the sun is positioned directly above the Earth’s equator, which happens just twice a year on the vernal and autumnal equinoxes. In March (usually the 20th or 21st), the sun crosses the equator from south to north, bringing warmth and light back to the Northern Hemisphere, and plunging the Southern Hemisphere into its fall and winter darkness. In September (around the 22nd or 23rd), the sun crosses back from south to north, heralding the start of fall in the Northern Hemisphere, and the start of spring in the Southern one.
The word “equinox” comes from the Latin for “equal” and “night,” because as the sun crosses the equator (Earth’s midline point) the hours of daylight and nighttime are very nearly equal. The equinoxes are the only time when the sun rises directly due East and sets directly due West for everyone on Earth.
A 16th century illustration of the seasons and the equinoxes.
The earth during the Spring Equinox