the Cyclops Convex Mirror

In All, Mirrors by Mark Evans

The Cyclops convex mirror is big.  The frame has been in my storeroom for over ten years and its only recently that I got inspired enough to do something with it.  The frame is lacquered black and the rings of molding are gilded.  The frame is studded with plexiglass/acrylic spheres alternating in size.  They are reflected in a steeply curved convex mirror; a true half-dome.  The mirror is made of polycarbonite.  The recessed ring is covered in clear Venetian glass rods.

The reflection of the frame in the mirror is truly an optic distortion worthy of a fun house.

This mirror is about 30 inches in diameter.

The Cyclops convex mirror is in my LA showroom, Quintus. Call 323-634-1924 for more information.

Jewelry for walls!

The Cyclops convex mirror is named for the mythological giants who were gigantic, one-eyed beings with enormous strength. Originally, there were three of them: Arges, Steropes, and Brontes; capable blacksmiths, these were the sons of Uranus and Gaea and the brothers of the Titans. They were imprisoned by Cronus but released by his son Zeus, for whom they forged his famous thunderbolt as a sign of gratitude. However, at a later time, poets spoke of a different type of Cyclopes, a race of dim-witted and violent one-eyed shepherds dwelling in the caves of the island of Sicily. The most famous among them was Polyphemus, the Cyclops who fell in love with Galatea and was eventually blinded by Odysseus.

For more go to: https://www.greekmythology.com/Myths/Creatures/Cyclopes/cyclopes.html

Odysseus and His Men Escaping the Cyclops by Jacob Jordeans circa 1635.  Go to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polyphemus

 

The Cyclops Gazing at Galatea by Odilon Redon in 1914. A rather tender image of the Cyclops in love…

 

My first movie was The 7th Voyage of Sinbad directed by the legendary Ray Harryhousen in 1958. His pioneering stop/motion animation has influenced designers and directors such as Tim Burton. He also introduced me to the Cyclops!