the Bronzino Convex Mirror

In All, Mirrors by Mark Evans

The Bronzino  convex mirror frame is made of wood composite that I re-finished and gilded it in gold metal leaf. The rays of the sunburst are layers and layers of gold, bronze, yellow and straw Venetian glass rods and glass, gilded cabochons.

Bronzino is big, heavy and glittering like a Catholic/Vatican monstrance.

This mirror is about 26 inches in diameter.  It is in my studio until being shipped to one of my showrooms.

Jewelry for walls!

Bronzino is one of my favorite renaissance artists.  I have studied his work for decades and have come to appreciate his immaculate technique and sensitive insight into the human condition.   The finish of his paintings remind me of the glassy surface of enamels.

Agnolo Bronzino, born Agnolo di Cosimo but most commonly referred to as Bronzino, was a stand-out artist of the second-wave of Italian Mannerism in the middle of the 16th century. He lived his entire life in Florence and modeled his painting style so closely to his Italian Mannerist mentor( and probable lover), Jacopo Pontormo, that art historians today still debate the origin of several paintings.

Succeeding where Pontormo had not, Bronzino eventually became court painter to the powerful Medici family of Florence and became famous for his portraiture style which meshed a detached realism, depicting cold and often arrogant expressions of his noblemen sitters, with bold colors such as ice blue and raspberry red. His portraits have proven to be his primary legacy and influenced portraiture painting for a century following his death in 1572.

Agnolo Bronzino, born Agnolo di Cosimo but most commonly referred to as Bronzino, was a stand-out artist of the second-wave of Italian Mannerism in the middle of the 16th century. He lived his entire life in Florence and modeled his painting style so closely to his Italian Mannerist mentor, Jacopo Pontormo, that art historians today still debate the origin of several paintings.

Succeeding where Pontormo had not, Bronzino eventually became court painter to the powerful Medici family of Florence and became famous for his portraiture style which meshed a detached realism, depicting cold and often arrogant expressions of his noblemen sitters, with bold colors such as ice blue and raspberry red. His portraits have proven to be his primary legacy and influenced portraiture painting for a century following his death in 1572.

For more of Bronzino’s biography go to https://www.artble.com/artists/agnolo_bronzino

A fresco portrait of Bronzino by Alessandro Allori

Eleanora of Toledo with her son Giovanni de’Medici, 1545

Portrait of a Young Man, 1535, Metropolitan Museum of Art, NY

Descent of Christ into Limbo, 1552

For more on Bronzino and the above painting go to https://www.nytimes.com/2010/11/16/arts/16iht-conway.html

Sample : In 1552, the artist crowded his “Descent of Christ into Limbo” for the Santa Croce church with lovely nudes of both sexes and all ages, many of them recognizable as living Florentines, including two celebrated local beauties. Vasari praised them for their “different features and attitudes that are depicted very naturally,” but others thought that this time the painter’s realism had gone too far. The panel has been regularly condemned as lewd, even into modern times.

Thank you NYTimes and the author